Новости

The Business Unit Turbocharger at MAN Diesel has recently announced that its complete ranges of TCA axial and TCR radial turbochargers are available for both two and four-stroke engines complying with IMO Tier II emissions legislation. Indeed, the Augsburg-based engine and turbocharger specialist stresses, the requirements of IMO Tier II engines were designed into the TCA and TCR turbochargers from the first.
Importantly, to eliminate additional work for engine builders, the new, higher performance IMO Tier II turbocharger versions from MAN Diesel retain the same external and connection dimensions as versions for IMO Tier I compliant engines. In this way, no changes are needed to the existing turbocharger mounting arrangement when upgrading an ongoing engine series to IMO Tier II compliance.   The major change with the IMO Tier II versions of TCA and TCR turbochargers has been to increase pressure ratios to enable Miller cycles of varying intensity as a means of substantially reducing the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). On four-stroke engines this involves closing the inlet valve early to allow the incoming air to expand and cool and thus eliminate the combustion temperature peaks responsible for the majority of NOx formation. On low-speed, two-stroke engines the same effect is achieved by reduction of compression volume, increased scavenging air pressure and late closing of the exhaust valve, in some cases combined with optimisation of the fuel system. Higher pressure turbocharging ensures that an equivalent amount of air enters the cylinder, thus leaving engine power, torque and response unaffected.
For two-stroke engine applications MAN Diesel reports that the necessary increase in pressure ratio is achieved exclusively via minor changes to the internal flow components of the turbochargers. On the four-stroke side, the new high-pressure turbocharger versions feature a revised design of compressor wheel with enhanced performance, as well as a number of further internal revisions.

29/06/2009

Repsol YPF, S.A., Spain’s largest oil company, has turned to GE Energy’s Frame 6B gas turbine technology to help meet its growing energy needs while also reducing emissions.
GE will supply one Frame 6B gas turbine for a new, 42-megawatt cogeneration plant that is part of the expansion of Repsol’s oil refinery located 13 kilometers east of the city of Cartagena, Spain. This will be the 14th Frame 6B that GE has provided to Repsol and its affiliates. The unit will be maintained under an existing service agreement between the two companies.
The Cartagena refinery was the first one on the Iberian Peninsula. Since 2000, it has been connected by oil pipeline to the Puertollano refinery, with a total processing capacity of 5.5 million tons of crude oil per year. When completed, the expansion will considerably increase that capacity and the Frame 6B-powered cogeneration plant is expected to help meet Repsol’s increased electricity and steam needs. Plans are for surplus electricity to be sold to the local grid.
The new power plant offers an example of the significant growth that cogeneration is experiencing in Spain. The Spanish government supports cogeneration as part of its initiative to foster energy savings, reduce grid losses and reduce greenhouse emissions.
Cogeneration is the simultaneous production of electricity and useful heat from the same fuel or energy. Facilities with cogeneration systems use them to produce their own electricity and use the unused excess (waste) heat for process steam, hot water heating, space heating and other thermal needs. They may also use excess process heat to produce steam for electricity production.
The Repsol project is expected to begin commercial service in 2011.

29/06/2009

Wärtsilä has received another major order from Pakistan. The order was placed by Liberty Power Tech Ltd. which is an independent power producer (IPP). The value of the contract is approximately EUR 137 million. The total gross electrical power output of the power plant is 200 MWe and the plant will be located near Faisalabad some 200 km west from Lahore.
The power plant is due to be commissioned in December 2010 and it will supply electricity to the country’s national grid. This order follows three other IPP projects signed by Wärtsilä in 2007 and 2008. Including these last four orders the total generating capacity delivered by Wärtsilä to Pakistan will exceed 1700 MWe.
The Liberty Power Tech combined cycle solution is an EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) order and it will comprise eleven Wärtsilä 18V46 generating sets. In addition to the equipment supply, Wärtsilä will also erect, test and commission the plant and provide local construction supervision. An O&M contract to operate and maintain the power plant is also under negotiation between Wärtsilä and the customer.
The Liberty Power Tech power plant will have a notably high overall efficiency of 45 percent for the lifetime of the plant when running on heavy fuel oil at site conditions. This level of efficiency on low-cost fuel oil will enable the generating costs to be very competitive.

26/06/2009

MAN Diesel SE has received an order from the Saudi cement manufacturer Yanbu Cement Company to enlarge an already existing power plant. The total project volume is around 60 million euro, with a share for MAN Diesel worth 45 million euro. Six MAN Diesel 9L58/64 engines are to be added to the diesel power plant supplying the customer's cement works with energy. MAN Diesel will also expand the power plant building plus all external facilities and supply the entire electro-mechanical equipment required for generating electricity. This order will help the Augsburg-based company to continue to expand its strong market position as a provider of turnkey diesel power stations, even in these economically difficult times.
Yanbu Cement Company, named after the city of Yanbu' al-Bahr on the west coast of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, has been a customer of MAN Diesel since 1994 and already uses nine MAN Diesel engines of the same type to generate electricity at the works. With a total output of 175 MW, the new engines will make this the world's largest diesel power plant integral to a cement factory. The amount of energy would be sufficient to supply a small town with electricity. Yanbu Cement Company is the second largest cement manufacturer in Saudi Arabia and produces between 5,000 and 10,000 tons of clinker per day. The company exports worldwide and has significantly increased its production capacities over the last few years. The six new engines will cover the factory's increased energy needs and also serve as a basis for further growth.
The engine type used – the 9L58/64 – is a highly reliable and low-maintenance power unit with an output of 11,790 kW (approx. 16,000 HP).

26/06/2009

GE Energy is introducing a next-generation, ultra-efficient Jenbacher ‘Type 6’ gas engine to help European Union (EU) member states comply with a directive to install new industrial, commercial and residential cogeneration systems that boost energy efficiency while reducing local fossil fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.
Evaluated in “pilot” combined heat and power (CHP) plants supporting two commercial horticultural greenhouse sites in the Netherlands, GE’s new ‘6F’ gas engines recently reached a critical performance milestone of 10,000 operating hours. Even more impressive for customers: the new 3.3-megawatt (MW) 6F units demonstrated an increased output of up to 10% and a crucial 1% hike in electrical efficiency over existing systems.
For the pilot projects, Netherlands growers Kwekerij Baarenburg and Kwekerij de Kabel B.V. installed GE’s proven Jenbacher standardized greenhouse application (cogeneration with CO2 fertilization)—each powered by a J612 “6F“ unit—to optimize energy efficiency and crop production. The “Baarenburg” greenhouse is commercially cultivating roses, whereas the latter greenhouse previously had installed three of GE’s J616 Jenbacher gas engines at the same location, being a member of the Prominent Growers Association, a leading Netherlands cooperative for tomato growers that has adopted GE’s Jenbacher CHP technology at a number of sites in recent years.
The operators of the “Baarenburg” and “Prominent Kabel“ greenhouses have signed a full customer service contract with GE for the two 6F CHP plants that will cover the units up to their first major overhaul needed at 60,000 operating hours. The units feature electrical efficiency ratings of 44.1% and 44.8%, respectively.

26/06/2009

The specialist for propulsion and power solutions Tognum has been selected to deliver six complete emergency power supply systems over the course of this year. These systems are destined for the initial planning stage of the new airport “Berlin Brandenburg International (BBI)” which is scheduled to be taken into operation in 2011. Depending on passenger numbers, plans currently envisage a gradual expansion over the coming years – an expansion which would require additional emergency power supply systems. The current order awarded by E.ON edis AG, worth € 3.7 million, is of substantial importance with regard to potential follow-up orders.
The MTU Onsite Energy emergency power supply systems are based on MTU 20V 4000 G23 engines. The six gensets have a total overall power output of approximately 12.7 MW. Among other things, these emergency power supply systems will ensure runway and landing-strip lighting at BBI.
Apart from the gensets, the scope of delivery includes the emergency power supply switchgear, cooling, exhaust gas and fuel systems, as well as intake and exhaust air systems. Delivery is scheduled between August and December 2009.
The expansion of the existing Schönefeld airport to become the new capital’s BBI central airport began in 2006. As of 2011, the airport is scheduled to absorb the entire air traffic volume in the Berlin-Brandenburg region. BBI’s initial passenger capacities range between 22 and 25 million per year. Plans are based on BBI’s potential to expand this volume up to between 40 and 45 million passengers over the next few years. This would equal more than two thirds of the current passenger volumes at Frankfurt/Main airport.

25/06/2009

Siemens Energy has secured an order from Abu Dhabi for construction of the Shuweihat II combined cycle power plant with integrated seawater desalination facility. The company will build the plant as a turnkey project together with the partners Doosan Heavy Industries and Samsung Engineering & Construction approximately 200 kilometers west of Abu Dhabi. After the scheduled start of operation in September 2011, the plant will generate 1500 megawatts of electricity net and feed approximately 455,000 cubic meters of water daily into the local drinking water network. Project developer is GDF Suez. End customer is the local energy provider Abu Dhabi Electricity & Water Authority (ADWEA). The value of the order for Siemens is more than EUR350 million.
Siemens scope of supply is mainly the power plant’s main components comprising four SGT5-4000F gas turbines, two SST5-6000 steam turbines, six generators, the electrical systems and I&C package SPPA-T3000 for total plant control. Doosan Heavy Industries will build the seawater desalination plant based on MSF technology. Samsung Engineering & Construction will be responsible for civil works.
Siemens Energy is market leader in the Gulf Region in the construction of power plants with seawater desalination facilities. After Al Taweelah A 2, which was completed in 2001, Siemens commissioned the Al Teweelah New B Extension back in the fall of 2008. Siemens had also been contracted with the erection of  Shuweihat I and Mirfa in Abu Dhabi.

25/06/2009