Новости

The specialist for propulsion and power solutions Tognum has recently been awarded a strategically important onsite energy contract by international construction firm Orascom Construction Industries. Tognum is to furnish a new airport tower at Cairo International Airport – the airport with the second highest passenger numbers on the African continent – with two emergency power supply gensets.
These MTU Onsite Energy gensets are designed to supply the new tower, which is scheduled to start operating in June, with emergency power whenever outages occur.
The emergency power supply gensets equipped with 12V 4000 G63 engines deliver a total of 4,000 kVA electrical power. Should the power supply in the tower fail, the MTU Onsite Energy gensets ensure air traffic control continues as required.
Strict regulations apply to the technical requirements imposed on the operation of gensets for airport control towers. These affect, in particular, the stability of both voltage and frequency when activating a variety of consumer units, e.g. elevators, lighting or IT systems. Also, sound insulation is used in the intake and exhaust air areas in order to keep well below the maximum permitted noise emission limits.

30/06/2009

The power unit commissioned by Energotechmontazh, MPNU designed on the base of C-30 microturbine by Capstone Turbine Corporation was put in operation at the beginning of the year as part of the power complex at the industrial site.
In addition to gas turbine power unit the power complex is equipped with GFL-200 Vacotin Heater vacuum boiler by Takuma Boiler Company (Japan) with the capacity of 300 kW and 500 kW NPR-500 hot-water boiler manufactured by Garioni Naval (Italy).

30/06/2009

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) and Southern Company, a major U.S. electric utility, will jointly demonstrate a plant to test technology enabling recovery of between 100,000 and 150,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year from flue-gas emissions from a coal-fired power generation plant.
The demonstration, involving the equivalent of emissions from 25 megawatts of the plant's generating capacity, is scheduled to begin operating by the first quarter of 2011. While the technology to recover and compress CO2 from natural gas-fired flue gas has already been applied commercially, the planned development and demonstration testing of the plant in the application of CO2 recovery from flue gas of coal-fired generation plant, which contains more impurities, will be on a scale unprecedented anywhere in the world.
Based on the test results, MHI will pursue the CO2 recovery/compression technology needed for commercial-scale carbon capture.
The host site for the carbon capture project is Plant Barry, a unit of Southern Company subsidiary Alabama Power. The MHI carbon capture technology will be installed on an existing unit of the plant, with the CO2 captured in the demonstration transported by pipeline and injected underground at a site away from the plant grounds. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership will be responsible for the transport and sequestration.
Specifically, MHI will be responsible for plant engineering, equipment supply, and provision of technical support during the demonstration phase.
The CO2 recovery and compression process consists of various facilities, including those for high-performance pre-processing desulfurization, flue gas CO2 recovery, recovered CO2 compression and utility.
MHI's CO2 recovery technology is KM-CDR Process™ ("The Process") that uses the company's proprietary KS-1 solvent for CO2 absorption and desorption, which MHI and the Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. jointly developed. The Process requires considerably lower energy consumption than other technologies. Through the demonstration of the efficiency of The Process for the level of impurities contained in coal-fired flue gas in order to confirm the technology which is commercially viable.

29/06/2009

The Business Unit Turbocharger at MAN Diesel has recently announced that its complete ranges of TCA axial and TCR radial turbochargers are available for both two and four-stroke engines complying with IMO Tier II emissions legislation. Indeed, the Augsburg-based engine and turbocharger specialist stresses, the requirements of IMO Tier II engines were designed into the TCA and TCR turbochargers from the first.
Importantly, to eliminate additional work for engine builders, the new, higher performance IMO Tier II turbocharger versions from MAN Diesel retain the same external and connection dimensions as versions for IMO Tier I compliant engines. In this way, no changes are needed to the existing turbocharger mounting arrangement when upgrading an ongoing engine series to IMO Tier II compliance.   The major change with the IMO Tier II versions of TCA and TCR turbochargers has been to increase pressure ratios to enable Miller cycles of varying intensity as a means of substantially reducing the formation of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). On four-stroke engines this involves closing the inlet valve early to allow the incoming air to expand and cool and thus eliminate the combustion temperature peaks responsible for the majority of NOx formation. On low-speed, two-stroke engines the same effect is achieved by reduction of compression volume, increased scavenging air pressure and late closing of the exhaust valve, in some cases combined with optimisation of the fuel system. Higher pressure turbocharging ensures that an equivalent amount of air enters the cylinder, thus leaving engine power, torque and response unaffected.
For two-stroke engine applications MAN Diesel reports that the necessary increase in pressure ratio is achieved exclusively via minor changes to the internal flow components of the turbochargers. On the four-stroke side, the new high-pressure turbocharger versions feature a revised design of compressor wheel with enhanced performance, as well as a number of further internal revisions.

29/06/2009

Repsol YPF, S.A., Spain’s largest oil company, has turned to GE Energy’s Frame 6B gas turbine technology to help meet its growing energy needs while also reducing emissions.
GE will supply one Frame 6B gas turbine for a new, 42-megawatt cogeneration plant that is part of the expansion of Repsol’s oil refinery located 13 kilometers east of the city of Cartagena, Spain. This will be the 14th Frame 6B that GE has provided to Repsol and its affiliates. The unit will be maintained under an existing service agreement between the two companies.
The Cartagena refinery was the first one on the Iberian Peninsula. Since 2000, it has been connected by oil pipeline to the Puertollano refinery, with a total processing capacity of 5.5 million tons of crude oil per year. When completed, the expansion will considerably increase that capacity and the Frame 6B-powered cogeneration plant is expected to help meet Repsol’s increased electricity and steam needs. Plans are for surplus electricity to be sold to the local grid.
The new power plant offers an example of the significant growth that cogeneration is experiencing in Spain. The Spanish government supports cogeneration as part of its initiative to foster energy savings, reduce grid losses and reduce greenhouse emissions.
Cogeneration is the simultaneous production of electricity and useful heat from the same fuel or energy. Facilities with cogeneration systems use them to produce their own electricity and use the unused excess (waste) heat for process steam, hot water heating, space heating and other thermal needs. They may also use excess process heat to produce steam for electricity production.
The Repsol project is expected to begin commercial service in 2011.

29/06/2009

Wärtsilä has received another major order from Pakistan. The order was placed by Liberty Power Tech Ltd. which is an independent power producer (IPP). The value of the contract is approximately EUR 137 million. The total gross electrical power output of the power plant is 200 MWe and the plant will be located near Faisalabad some 200 km west from Lahore.
The power plant is due to be commissioned in December 2010 and it will supply electricity to the country’s national grid. This order follows three other IPP projects signed by Wärtsilä in 2007 and 2008. Including these last four orders the total generating capacity delivered by Wärtsilä to Pakistan will exceed 1700 MWe.
The Liberty Power Tech combined cycle solution is an EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) order and it will comprise eleven Wärtsilä 18V46 generating sets. In addition to the equipment supply, Wärtsilä will also erect, test and commission the plant and provide local construction supervision. An O&M contract to operate and maintain the power plant is also under negotiation between Wärtsilä and the customer.
The Liberty Power Tech power plant will have a notably high overall efficiency of 45 percent for the lifetime of the plant when running on heavy fuel oil at site conditions. This level of efficiency on low-cost fuel oil will enable the generating costs to be very competitive.

26/06/2009

MAN Diesel SE has received an order from the Saudi cement manufacturer Yanbu Cement Company to enlarge an already existing power plant. The total project volume is around 60 million euro, with a share for MAN Diesel worth 45 million euro. Six MAN Diesel 9L58/64 engines are to be added to the diesel power plant supplying the customer's cement works with energy. MAN Diesel will also expand the power plant building plus all external facilities and supply the entire electro-mechanical equipment required for generating electricity. This order will help the Augsburg-based company to continue to expand its strong market position as a provider of turnkey diesel power stations, even in these economically difficult times.
Yanbu Cement Company, named after the city of Yanbu' al-Bahr on the west coast of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia, has been a customer of MAN Diesel since 1994 and already uses nine MAN Diesel engines of the same type to generate electricity at the works. With a total output of 175 MW, the new engines will make this the world's largest diesel power plant integral to a cement factory. The amount of energy would be sufficient to supply a small town with electricity. Yanbu Cement Company is the second largest cement manufacturer in Saudi Arabia and produces between 5,000 and 10,000 tons of clinker per day. The company exports worldwide and has significantly increased its production capacities over the last few years. The six new engines will cover the factory's increased energy needs and also serve as a basis for further growth.
The engine type used – the 9L58/64 – is a highly reliable and low-maintenance power unit with an output of 11,790 kW (approx. 16,000 HP).

26/06/2009